Saturday, March 31, 2007

Eclipse

I had to do an in-depth examination of a Java AppServer that our group has written in order to do some prelimiary integration of my .NET client-side framework. I finally have had a chance to do some in-depth work with Eclipse, and there is definitely a lot of goodness in it.

I have to admit that there are a lot of positives about being in the Java world. I like the Java Community Process, and the fact that major functionality is discussed in the open before the spec is drafted. There is a lot that Microsoft can learn from this.

©2007 Marc Adler - All Rights Reserved

3 comments:

Rut the Nut said...

Your group has written a Java AppServer ?

Not usually the recommended approach...

marc said...

I call it an "AppServer", although it is not an appserver like Weblogic and Websphere. It is a messaging, storage, caching, biz object, persistence framework ... kind of a mirror image to what I have written on the client side, except that it does not support anything visual.

Mainly used to handle apps that deal with orders and executions ... trading flows. Very low latency. We have some true rocket scientists on the team, including the guy who wrote the JMS implementation for BEA. His talent is indicative of the quality of the team.

Rut the Nut said...

I see, not a J2EE server then, but with certain elements of that functionality. Still need a lot of convincing that it is worthwhile writing a custom server though, but that may have been perfectly valid in your environment (geeks/gurus not-withstanding).

Eclipse is a pretty good IDE for general Java dev. Paid-for IDEs give other features that can be helpful, but to be honest most advantages come from having good developers with a good approach to software.

By the way, of the many, many, plug-ins an enhancements to Eclipse, one that has some convenient features for free is 'Lomboz'. This is an open source offering with a number of plugins that support J2EE development. Info available at objectweb.org (if I got the link right).

And if you want third-party validation of Java development, feel free to contact Smart421 in the UK :) Not sure it would be entirely cost-effective for you, but we do plenty of work in London...

All the best,
John